Internet Safety

Planning for Safety

Create a Safety Plan:

If you are in or are planning to leave a violent relationship, it is important to make a safety plan first. You should talk to someone you trust about your plan if possible. If you do not have someone you can trust, you can always call the Philadelphia Domestic Violence Hotline (1-866-723-3014) to talk to one of our crisis intervention counselors.

  • Know where you can get help. Keep a list of important phone numbers (police, domestic violence hotline, hospital).
  • Plan with your children. Identify a safe place for them (room with a lock, neighbor’s house). Let them know that their job is to stay safe; not to protect you.
  • Arrange a signal with a neighbor for when you need help.
  • Prepare an emergency kit that you can get to quickly. (You may want to keep it at a trusted friend’s/neighbor’s house.)

Include:

  • An extra set of car and house keys
  • Money, food stamps, checkbook, credit card(s), pay stubs
  • Birth certificates and other ID for you and your children
  • Driver’s license or other photo identification
  • Social security card or green card/work permit
  • Health insurance cards, medications for you and your children
  • Deed or lease to your house or apartment
  • Any court papers or orders
  • Change of clothes for you and your children
  • Plan the safest time to get away. Know how you will leave and which doors or windows you will use.
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Justine’s Story

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Dana’s Story

Dana’s Story

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Doreen Davis’ Story

Doreen Davis’ Story

Doreen Davis is a longtime supporter of Women Against Abuse who has used her expertise in traditional labor law to assist WAA for over two decades.

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If you or someone you know needs help, call our toll-free 24-hour Hotline:

1.866.723.3014

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